Wednesday, 15 August 2007

Mexican economic migrants posing as refugees

Mexican refugee requests skyrocket

Middle class wants to escape drug cartels, corrupt authorities
Aug 05, 2007 04:30 AM
Nicholas Keung
IMMIGRATION/DIVERSITY REPORTER


Manuel Lanveros could have come to Canada through normal immigration channels as a skilled immigrant.

Instead, the Mexican citizen simply hopped on a plane and asked for refugee asylum here because, he says, he couldn't afford to risk his life on the two-year wait.

An architect with 15 years of experience, Lanveros represents a new wave of Mexican refugees who contradict the desperate day-labourer stereotype: educated, upper-middle-class professionals who claim corrupt authorities are failing to protect them from drug cartels, abusive spouses or gay bashers.


Note - Canada's refugee system at one time only applied to those escaping political persecution. It has since been expanded to include sexual orientation and victims of spousal abuse, going further than what the U.N. considers a refugee. This exposes Canada to further abuse of our refugee system with bogus claims and in fact it has been found that many are trying to make a refugee claim based on sexual orientation and spousal abuse. Once these people are granted refugee status the chain migration starts and they start to import their families. It's a scam but no one in Ottawa seems to care.

According to the Immigration and Refugee Board, Mexican asylum claims have skyrocketed in a decade, from fewer than 1,000 a year to 5,000. For the past two years, Mexico has been Canada's top source country for refugee claims.

...

"My concern is we're going to be swarmed by Mexicans in the U.S. who don't have status there and can come to the border because they don't need a visa to come to Canada," says Rico-Martinez, himself a refugee from El Salvador. "We're starting to get calls from Mexicans in the States, five to six a week, hoping to file refugee (claims) in Canada. But we may not even know half of the Mexicans here who are without status, because they don't need visas to come."

Anticipating a continued influx, the refugee board is now treating Mexican cases as a top priority. Some cases are heard within six months, compared with the more typical 12 to 18 months.

...

Advocates argue that most Canadians view Mexico through the benign lens of a tourist – as a free, democratic country – and fail to recognize how corruption there can leave people vulnerable to crime. That blind spot, they say, is reflected in the high rates of rejection for Mexican refugee claims. "Our concern is whether Mexicans can get a fair hearing, when most people simply assume they are economic migrants," says Janet Dench, executive director of the Canadian Council for Refugees. "And we've seen our share of prejudice against the Mexicans."


Note - Mexico is still a relatively safe country to live. It is much safer than most South American nations. Mexico City even has its own Gay Pride celebrations laying to waste any claim of persecution based on sexual orientation.

The FCJ Refugee Centre's Rico-Martinez thinks it's only a matter of time before Canada imposes visa requirements on Mexicans, as it did on Zimbabweans and Argentines when it felt a need to curb the inflow of refugees.

Read it all here.

The sooner Canada slaps Mexicans with visa requirements the better. And while Canada is at it, Canada should do the same for many other countries as well. The article notes, "Like Americans, Mexicans don’t need visas to visit. As such, they’re exempt from Canada’s bilateral Safe Third Country Agreement with the United States, which stipulates that asylum seekers must file refugee claims in the first country they enter." Mexican refugees have a 28% acceptance rate and that is too high. We shouldn't even be entertaining Mexican refugee claims. But we do entertain refugee claims from Americans and Portuguese so why not Mexicans?

Yes, Mexico is corrupt; it has a drug cartel problem. It does have spousal abusers and gay bashers but so does Canada. Canada has every legal right to send back every Mexican refugee claim because internal flight is open to them. Mexico City is large enough to get lost in. It has a large gay community there. If the character of Mexican society is enough to make a refugee claim then, by way of legal precedence, Canada cannot stop the claims of hundreds of millions of other people who live in countries that are in worse shape.

Canada should not even accept one person from Mexico as a refugee because they are not real refugees but are in fact economic migrants. As the Toronto Star article illustrates Mexican refugees are increasingly of the middle class but such is the case with almost all refugees to Canada. It is the mobile upper and middle classes of the developing world that are making refugee claims. The poor, those who most need Canada's help, cannot afford it.

4 comments:

Martinez Lopez Gonzalez said...

I’m a Mexican citizen, I move to Canada when I receive an invitation to work in a Canadian Company which thought my collaboration and qualifications they make million$, they never found someone qualified to achieve the company expectations in Canada or another countries, I’m a scientist made in the public system of education in Mexico, I saw many Mexicans well educated here in Canada and other countries, so I found very poor your opinion about the Mexican situation, obviously you don’t have a clue about the Mexican situation and corruption there, but well, I learn to respect the freedom of the people to express them self doesn’t matter if they don’t have the knowledge or criteria to argue about the subject.
Your writing is racist against Mexicans, Is well know that attitude in United States...but in Canada?
Is not possible to make a distinction as you want, for Mexicans refugees, since the refugee claim is a legitimate procedure based in the United Nations convention doesn’t matter which country you come from.
There are a universal code of ethic that all we have to respect, the refugee process is not a joke, and since the experience and perspective of live in Toronto I saw many cases of people from many countries, NOT ONLY mexicans cheating the refugee claim process, a liar is a liar, doesn’t matter the country or background, also an ass hold is always an ass hold as is your case doesn’t whoever that you are...was that clear?!
Send me your coordinates and I’ll explain you face to face....MF!!!

PaxCanadiana said...

I contest the claim of the company you work for that they never found anybody qualified in Canada to work for them. I say that because that is the usual line given by the business community to import cheaper labour outside the country. A good example is the IT industry. You may also be surprised to learn that Canada has the most university educated and college educated workforce in all of the industrialized world which includes Japan, the United States, and Germany. So to tell me that they found no one qualified enough in Canada seems to be a stretching of the truth.

Also, your acceptable command of the English language makes me all the more suspicious of your superior qualifications. I'd figure your company, the one that makes "million$", would hire someone who wrote in the English language as well as they spoke it. Are you sure you were the best qualified and not just the cheapest?

Mexico may be corrupt but does that warrant a refugee claim? No it doesn't. Mexico may not be the best place to live but it is not horrible enough for any middle class Mexican to be making a refugee claim. And Canada's refugee determination system has been so broadened that is goes beyond what the UN convention on refugees states. If Canada actually applied the UN convention on refugees, to the letter, for every Mexican refugee claimant then every one of them would be turned away at the boarder.

There are a universal code of ethic that all we have to respect, the refugee process is not a joke, and since the experience and perspective of live in Toronto I saw many cases of people from many countries, NOT ONLY mexicans cheating the refugee claim process, a liar is a liar,

Canada's refugee system is a joke if middle class Mexicans can make successful refugee claims.

Also, the illegal mass immigration of Mexicans into the United States is creating a volatile situation that I do not want replicated here. Canada's immigration system is not another form of foreign aid.

Anonymous said...

Before I make any comments on the subject I must warn you that my written English is as terrible as my spoken, despite of which I would really like to say something on this particular subject.
I´m a mexican as well, and what really makes me sad is not what the article poses but instead the lack of objectivity on both sides. As a mexican; living in Mexico, I understand and empathize with the people that´s leaving the country in order to find a healthier and safer way of living. I think about that quite often. But there are jurisdictional frames that regulate such actions which is why all of us can actually have some order and a grater deal of security. That´s why I understand, the perspective of the articles author as well. What I dont understand is why us humans always have to recur to our egos in order to make our selves clear. Why don't we just stop seeing each others as canadian or mexican, with different interests, and start to feel each others as human beings, a more emphatic and less defensive kind of sight.

PaxCanadiana said...

Why don't we just stop seeing each others as canadian or mexican, with different interests, and start to feel each others as human beings, a more emphatic and less defensive kind of sight.Because the real world doesn't operate that way. People seek belonging and find it in ethnic, religious, racial, and national identities and find pride in that and there's nothing wrong with that either.

Immigrant groups in Toronto are culturally chauvinistic and display no real intent to assimilate. They speak lovingly of their "home" country and they revel in their differences and being the "other" and then complain that they are not accepted as being Canadian. Well, what did you expect?