Monday, 15 October 2007

Toronto Star reality is business

Heroine addiction is a Canadian reality so does that mean we need to tolerate and accommodate that as well? A bad thing is a bad thing and if it is bad for the country then we need to stop it.

This is in response to an editorial in the Toronto Star

Canadian reality is multicultural

Oct 15, 2007 04:30 AM


The tone and purpose of this editorial is Orwellian, littered with the usual slogans and words used in multicult speak as devices to indoctrinate the reader. The following paragraphs serves as an example:

Clearly, all of Canada continues to struggle through multiculturalism issues and to define what it means to be a Canadian. Few countries have opened their doors to such a wide cross-section of immigrants as Canada and no city has embraced it more than Toronto.

We can be proud of our diversity, of our willingness to embrace a wide range of cultural and religious differences. Yet many of our recent newcomers still face bigotry, racism and job discrimination.


If we dissect these two paragraphs we can see the propaganda machine at work.

Clearly, all of Canada continues to struggle through multiculturalism issues and to define what it means to be a Canadian.

This sentence is used to mask what is actually an attack on Canadian culture to appear as a challenge, a struggle, and a difficult but necessary process to understanding ourselves as Canadians because apparently the people we thought we were is wrong. The reality is the Toronto Star is wrong. All of Canada does not struggle through multiculturalism issues. There are many places and people in this country who understand quite well what it means to be a Canadian. Multiculturalism brings confusion and struggle because it demands that Canadians are not the people they think they are forcing us to redefine ourselves again, and again, and again to meet someone else's satisfaction. This redefining process erases the Canadian identity piece by piece until there is nothing left that defines what a Canadian is outside the legal right to hold a passport. This is true multiculturalism and the Canadian cannot exist within it.

Few countries have opened their doors to such a wide cross-section of immigrants as Canada and no city has embraced it more than Toronto.


This is typical ego stroking and it is a common trope in all pro multicultural arguments. By saying "few countries" this editorial wants us to believe that we are special and better than everyone else when it is quite possible that we haven't learned from other countries mistakes. This is to soften the resolve of the reader and render him or her more susceptible to the utopian message of multiculturalism.

You will also find the word "embrace" in all pro multiculturalism pieces. The reality is that Toronto hasn't so much as embraced multiculturalism but has had multiculturalism forced upon it. If you are stuck in Toronto then you have no choice but to "embrace" it as you go to sleep in Toronto and wake up the next morning in Mumbai. To get a clearer understanding of how well Toronto has "embraced" multiculturalism one needs to look at settlement patterns in the city. If Toronto has truly "embraced" multiculturalism then why do settlement patterns show that Toronto and GTA (Greater Toronto Area) residents prefer to live among their own people? Why are there so many ethnic enclaves, around 230 according to StatsCan, in the city? Why are so many whites leaving the city and moving to places like Barrie and Milton, adding to the population explosions in those towns, when Toronto, and by implication Canadians, has "embraced" multiculturalism?

We can be proud of our diversity, of our willingness to embrace a wide range of cultural and religious differences.

This sentence is another trope of pro multicultural pieces. It is tantamount to battle cries employed to rally up the troops and national anthems to stir up nationalist feelings. It appeals to the emotions more so than to the intellect. The "we" the Star editors are referring to are the Canadians who continue to suffer at the hand multicultural nonsense by having to surrender their identities out of fear for offending someone. It is the attitudes of Canadians that need to be softened because it is their identity that is being attacked and are thus pose a threat to the multicultural ideals of the Star editors.

Yet many of our recent newcomers still face bigotry, racism and job discrimination.

This is based largely on anecdotal evidence. There is no hard proof that immigrants are being discriminated against in the job market. If they feel that they are it is because there are no jobs for them here. Their importation was all part of the numbers game that Canada's immigration policy has become. The Star et al. choose to distract us from this fact because if we understood that Canada is importing more immigrants than the job market can bare than we may want to decrease the numbers and the Star can't have that. Also, newcomers may face bigotry and racism but they also employ bigotry and racism towards Canadians. The Star just reinforces the culture of victim hood that many minority groups and immigrants use in this country to their advantage.

The Toronto Star is concerned with multiculturalism because it is mass immigration from non traditional countries that is fueling the policy. The Star is fearful that a backlash against multiculturalism will result in demands for a saner immigration system with more manageable numbers. The Star does not want this because the paper owes much of the increase of its reader base to immigrants primarily those from China and India, Canada’s top two source countries for immigrants. The more readers a paper has the more it can charge advertisers for space. It’s about money. However if Canada began to import immigrant journalists en masse that either threatened the salaries of the Toronto Star journalists and editors, accused them of discrimination because the paper cannot accommodate the surplus of journalists, or competing ethnically specific papers steal away enough of the Star’s readers that it hurts profit margins then I’m sure the Star’s editorial Staff will change it’s tune. But right now the Toronto Star has a very Toronto attitude towards the rest of Canada: if it doesn’t bother me then let it be even if it hurts everyone else. And if I like then you’ll like it too whether you like it or not and if you don’t like it, well, that’s because you’re some dumb, inbred, ignorant, back water, bumbkin living north of Steeles Avenue. Gotta love Toronto.

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