Saturday, 22 March 2008

Canada accepting Vietnamese "boat people" as refugees even though the UN said they no longer need protection.

Read it here care of the Toronto Star.

Toronto welcomes 65 forgotten boat people

I always had hope,' says Vietnamese man who spent 18 years trying to get here
Mar 22, 2008 04:30 AM
Nicholas Keung
Immigration/Diversity Reporter


The first of 65 Vietnamese "boat people" who languished for years in refugee camps after the West slammed the door, landed in Toronto yesterday, 18 years late for the start of a new life of freedom.

Thai Van Nguyen is just one of 2,200 lost refugees, all uprooted by a war that ended more than a quarter of a century ago. They were left stranded after the United Nations declared in 1990 they were no longer in need of protection. The declaration led the West to slam its doors, leaving people like Nguyen out of luck.

I just love how this reporter uses such loaded words as "slam" and "slammed" as in "the West slammed the door" to describe how the West stop accepting Vietnamese "boat people" as refugees after the United Nations no longer considered these people in need of protection. He could have wrote "the West stopped accepting" if he wanted to be objective but since he is writing another immigration puff piece objectivity must be discarded.

Nguyen, 56, arrived at a refugee camp alone in Palawan in the Philippines and ended up stuck; the former seminary student languished there as a stateless person for 18 years.

I may be wrong but it is to my understanding that refugees are expected make their claim in the first country of safety. Why didn't they make asylum claims in the Philippines? Why were they languishingly in a refugee camp in the Philippines for 18 years? Why didn't they apply for citizenship or was Canada the intended target from the get go.

Six other former boat people arrived earlier this month in Calgary and Vancouver, with 300 in total expected in the next few months, including some 85 in Greater Toronto.

All are supported by small sponsor groups who responded to last year's "Freedom at Last" campaign by Canada's 150,000-strong Vietnamese community.


Almost one million refugees fled Vietnam after the fall of Saigon to the Communist regime in 1975, and most of the refugees in the Philippines have been there since 1988.

They were at the tail end of the exodus, when the United Nations declared the Vietnamese were no longer in need of protection.

We shouldn't be accepting refugees the United Nations declares are in no need or protection. What does this say about those who really do need our help? Why are we granting asylum to people on "compassionate and humanitarian grounds" who don't need it when there are millions of people who really do need our assistance? The reason is that these people had the funds to get to Canada's shores while the others are too poor to do so. It costs money to get to Canada even as a refugee and this should beg questions as to who is really getting in as a refugee. Are legitimate refugees getting here or is our refugee system being abused as another avenue for economic immigration?

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

""We shouldn't be accepting refugees the United Nations declares are in no need or protection.""

Canadians should be seeking protection from the Vietnamese gangs, specifically in Western Canada. What a joke.

Anonymous said...

According to the World Population Clock, the world's population is increasing at the phenomenal rate of about 6.5 million people every 30 days!

http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/popclockworld.html

That figure is more than the equivalent population of the Greater Toronto Area being added to the world every month.

Canada's current population is just over 33 million people with an additional 250,000 legal immigrants arriving here plus another 50,000 claiming to be "refugees" every year.

Needless to say, this population growth is fueled by developing countries populated by NON-white citizens. Our country has been suffering from an eroding White population base due to defeating immigration/refugee policies that demand we accept this world's un-assimilable overflow and pay for the privilege of having them here, whether we like or not.

"All [these Vietnamese 'boat people'] are supported by small sponsor groups who responded to last year's "Freedom at Last" campaign by Canada's 150,000-strong Vietnamese community."

Are Canadian taxpayers supporting these Vietnamese "sponsor groups" themselves?

Sooo........would these Vietnamese "sponsor groups" have any interest in helping an equal number of destitute Canadians sleeping under bridges in our own backyard or those whose bed tonight will be a cardboard sheet over a warm city grate? To answer my own question....of course not! They look after their own racial ethnic groups... even in faraway countries...again, with our privilege!

Upon arrival to this land of free money, our newest Vietnamese refugees will be guided to the nearest welfare office to receive their un-earned dole payouts that's befitting to many new foreigners. Isn't that the big carrot for wanting to come here in the first instance....instead of a neighbouring culture much like their own?

In Nicholas Keung's article, he slyly omits any reference to the enormous costs associated with refugees. No surprises there.

PaxCanadiana said...

Canadians should be seeking protection from the Vietnamese gangs, specifically in Western Canada.

According to the Vancouver police 90% of the pot trade is controlled by Vietnamese gangs. Whenever I read about a pot bust in southern Ontario those arrested invariably have Vietnamese names, Asian anyway. They even have brought their operations to cottage country.

Canada's current population is just over 33 million people with an additional 250,000 legal immigrants arriving here plus another 50,000 claiming to be "refugees" every year.

According to one Toronto Star editorial Canada "welcomed" almost half a billion (450,000) foreigners last year. Of that half a billion only 250-260,000 are granted permanent resident status. The rest, I assume, enter as "guest workers", refugees, and visitors however how many of these people actually leave when their time is up is not clear. So it is right to assume that Canada "welcomes", unofficially at least, over 300,000 permanent residents a year. This is not immigration. It is colonialism and population replacement.

Anonymous said...

Wow much stereotype in the comments. Canada is built on immigrants anyways.