Saturday, 30 August 2008

Is the "Juana Tejada Law" is a good thing?

A Filipina nanny (as if there is any other kind) developed terminal colon cancer while working in Canada. Her application for Canadian citizenship was denied becuase she was now considered medically inadmissible despite the fact that she was healthy when she initially arrived in the country. You can read the details here at the Toronto Star.

Dying nanny wants law change

Filipina caregiver, ill with cancer, granted residency after battle with federal government
Aug 26, 2008 04:30 AM
Deena Kamel
Staff Reporter


Juana Tejada, a Filipina nanny with terminal cancer who celebrated becoming a permanent resident yesterday, wants to make her dream of security in Canada a reality for other live-in caregivers.

A campaign led by unions and immigrant support groups is proposing a "Juana Tejada Law" – an amendment to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act that would help guarantee the rights of medically inadmissible but otherwise qualified foreign caregivers living in Canada.

[...]

Tejada had her immigration application denied twice because, though healthy when she arrived, she developed cancer while working in Canada and was now deemed a burden on the health-care system. But after strong public support, she was recently cleared to apply for permanent residency.

[...]

Before arriving in Canada, live-in caregivers undergo stringent medical exams.

They must live with the same employer for 24 months out of three years, then undergo a second medical exam to apply for permanent residence. Tejada's supporters want to see that second exam requirement eliminated for caregivers.

I am not certain if I support this or not. I do feel for the woman but I am also concerned about the undue strain this will put on Canada's already financially strapped and overburdened health care system, a situation Canada's mass immigration system has contributed to and worsened.

I don't see why we allow nannies to apply for permanent residency anyways. What skills do they bring to Canada that Canada cannot supply itself? It seems many Filipinas will suffer the indignity of caring for someone else's children (a shame equally borne by the employer who can't bother himself and herself to raise their own damn kids) as an avenue to citizenship. But why should we let them become citizens? When their care giving job is over then what do they do? It seems to me they are just adding to the surplus labour force. We also allow it becuase they supply cheap and easy access to readily exploitable third world labour for Canada's middle class.

I can also see the law being extended to other apply to other temporary workers in Canada. This is just one complication an increasingly temporary and foreign born workforce is bringing to Canadian society.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Just to add more ammunition to your argument, IWC wrote this article last October.

When patriarchal Sikh men begin attending dubious 'nanny schools' in their home countries for the express purpose of obtaining a Canadian work permit, well...duh!

I realize some immigration officials are quite dumb, but they can't be that stupid, so I must assume that corruption plays a big part in this scheme.

PaxCanadiana said...

I know that article and I blogged about it.

Shameful isn't it but a clear example of how the immigration system has more to do with political rewards than it does with serving the real needs of the country.

Anonymous said...

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Anonymous said...

"I don't see why we allow nannies to apply for permanent residency anyways. What skills do they bring to Canada that Canada cannot supply itself?"

Can you work as a live in nanny? ask you dumb self?
Are you educated? Ask your dumb self?

Note that most of the nannies who comes here are just their stepping stone to get the residency here, they are highly educated and with values coming to Canada, perhaps, that is the one these Filipino nannies can teach to Canadians, especially you - as you have no sense of values.
Most of the Nurses and Doctors who has a better life than you are from a Nanny job turned into a decorated professional and employee of Canada's leading Banks, Hospital and Government Institution.

PaxCanadiana said...

Can you work as a live in nanny?

Why not? Sit around the house all day baby-sitting some strangers children in between watching TV and gossiping to friends on your cell phone. It'd be the best job in the world if the pay didn't suck so much.

Note that most of the nannies who comes here are just their stepping stone to get the residency here...Most of the Nurses and Doctors who has a better life than you are from a Nanny job turned into a decorated professional and employee of Canada's leading Banks, Hospital and Government Institution.

Thank you for noticing that because that's the crux of my point. They didn't come here to work as nannies, they came here to compete for jobs Canadians want to do. Why would we Canadians invite this? They just increase competition in the labour market making things difficult for Canadians. In their pursuit of a better life for themselves they make ours worse as a consequence.

This is why nannies shouldn't be allowed to apply for permanent residency. They are temporary foreign workers by definition and by their actions. Seasonal farm workers cannot apply for permanent residency for good reason and neither should imported nannies.

Anonymous said...

Excellent post and responses. Keep in mind - will the Nanny's contributions ever outweigh what she will take in services (hospital stays, medical, etc.). Plus, it isn't just her - she will probably sponsor kids and other extended family, and not all will work, but they certainly will use services. Yes, it is just a revolving door, because even the person defending the system admitted it was simply a way to get permanent residence.

Flowers said...

Whoever wrote this blog is a very ignorant person.

Flowers said...

Whoever wrote this blog is a very ignorant person.